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Curiosity Grows Our World


There are times in our busy lives that it is easier to say no than do that little bit extra. That extra bit of effort for what seems of little reward.


Move from comfortable to uncomfortable. Rather than dismissing the opportunity with a perceived justification, utilise curiosity to grow your experiences and mindset.


Growth can only come from application of effort.


Recently the concept of effort and reward through curiosity came to fruition during a holiday at Bunker Bay, Western Australia.


It was just before sunset and my friend Chris Love suggested we go for a late swim in the bay. Now this is not necessarily the best idea considering the marine life that are actively prowling for dinner as night falls.


So it was with some persuasion that I reluctantly put on my bathers and went down to the beach.

This is when my life changed forever. I was about to encounter a brush with nature that is tattooed in my memory.


A seal had come into shore and was playing in the shallows. Rather than being apprehensive, our curiosity masked any fear, and our courage was plentiful.


We silently slipped into the water and moved closer to the seal who at this stage was also curious about his new marine friends.


Two things were going to happen either be attacked or be amazed. Either way it was going to make for a great story.


Thankfully it was the latter. Chris and I played for half an hour with the seal who mimicked our actions – nodding, staring, swimming, splashing, following, leading and playing.


To be this close to a wild animal in their environment on their terms was both terrifying and euphoric.


Leanne Gordon is an expert on using curiosity as a valuable tool for leaders to grow their team and themselves.


Leanne would refer to my curiosity as an Outer Question.


“Outer questions point curiosity outward toward those factors in our environment and to other people.”


On reflection it was curiosity that broke through the maze of legitimate self-preservation barriers. And it was the seal’s curiosity to allow us into their world I dare say breaking all their self-preservation rules.


As leaders, I can understand the strength of curiosity as a tool to cut through our limiting beliefs and grow as we understand more of the world around us.


Where has curiosity helped you to understand more about your team or yourself?

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